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Abigail Adams (1744-1818), was the wife of john Adams, the 2nd President of the United States of America, and the mother of 6th President, John Quincy Adams.  At the age of 20, she married John Adams and they had five children.  She strongly supported her husband's career. Her letters and memoirs are now considered major historical documents revealing life during the Revolutionary era.  (The letter below shows the great danger the colonists endured at the beginning of the Revolutionary War and should challenge us to stand fast during those times when all around us seems to require extraordinary patience, trust in our God and the ability to stand-and, when you have done all you can, to coninue standing, [Ephesians 6:13-14].  All quotes except those in parentheses are from "America's God and Country Encyclopedia of Quotations," Wm. J. Federer, page 2.  Editor)

On October 16, 1774, just prior to the outbreak of war with Great Britain, Abigail wrote to John Adams from their home in Braintree.  (Braintree was located within "firing distance" from Boston.  The noise of battle could be heard as the troops were fighting the first battle of the Revolutionary War.  What a scary time for a mother and son whose husband and father was then in Europe.  No wonder that the mother would "ardently long for" her husband!

I dare not express to you, at three hundred miles distance, how ardently I long for your return....  And whether the end will be tragical, Heaven only knows.  You cannot be, I know, nor do I wish to see you, an inactive spectator; but if the sword be drawn, I bid adieu to all domestic felicity, and look forward to that country where there are neither wars nor rumors of war, in a firm belief that through the mercy of its King we shall both rejoice there together...

Your most affectionate, 

Abigail Adams." 

 


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